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Back to School With a Mask

kids

Change is hard to get used to. But, with a little effort, you can adapt to many new things. One example of a big change is the way schools are running these days. They offer a completely different experience from what we are used to. Children must wear a school mask if they want to go to class.

Here’s how you can help your child get used to wearing a mask to school.

1. Beat the Fear

Facial coverings are designed to keep people safe, but they also hide a person’s face. This can be intimidating for a child. Children rely on their facial expressions to communicate. However, with a face mask, they can’t see the familiar faces and friendly smiles. This is unnatural and scary for them. These tips will help beat the fear.

Help the Child Get Accustomed to Masks

Wearing a facial covering can be difficult for a young child, even in short bursts. Therefore, practice becomes a key strategy. Ask the child to practice wearing the facial covering before they go outside. Teach them how to take it off and put it back on.

Share the importance of wearing a mask so that the child will realize why they are doing it. With regular wear, the struggle subsides, and they get used to it through routine.

Add a Personal Touch

Children need to feel comfortable with a face mask. Encouraging them to decorate is the best way to give them a sense of ownership. Tell your child to draw, put stickers, or bedazzle the mask. With it, they can show their creative side and obtain some level of control. They can also put their name on it so others know who they’re speaking to!

Introduce Playfulness

Fear can be a real setback. But, making the mask a fun experience can add an additional layer of safety. For example, play pretend with your child. Ask them to be a nurse or a doctor and to wear a mask while they care for you or a stuffed animal. Relying on “doctor kits” and favorite toys can be a great way of helping a child relax.

Implement a Sense of Security

Impulsive children tend to act without thinking. They may pull off the mask when they argue with friends without even realizing it. To fix the problem, apply a breakaway lanyard to the elastic strap of the mask. So, even if the child pulls the mask off, it won’t be lost and the facial covering will remain on their person. This can be used as a reminder for the child to put the mask back on.

Note: Do not create fear when a child wears a mask. Try to present it as a new but important habit for keeping themselves healthy during the pandemic. If you take a positive approach, the child is more likely to follow your example.

2. Find the Perfect Fit

Here is how to find a mask that will fit a child’s face.

Comfortable but Snug Fit

The mask must comfortably wrap around the child’s nose and mouth. There shouldn’t be any openings or loose ends. A poor fit will only encourage the child to use their hands to readjust the mask, exposing them to dangerous pathogens and contamination.

Smaller Size

Look for children’s masks designed to cover a smaller face. They must go over the nose and cover each side of the face. With adequate adjustment, there will be no fogging on their glasses.

No Pain

When the straps are too tight, they can hurt the back of the ears and the nose. A comfortable face mask doesn’t put that much pressure on these points. It doesn’t leave a mark or cause redness of the skin.

The Right Material

The mask is supposed to feature 3 to 4 textured cotton layers. Anything more than that will be too thick and cause trouble breathing. Fewer layers create bigger chances for exposure. So, opt for tightly-woven material with enough layering.

Safety

Do not use any small decorations or straps that may pose a choking hazard. It’s critical that the mask uses only comfortable materials to be safe to use.

3. Overcome the Sensory Issues

A child with sensory processing difficulties will have trouble tolerating the closeness, smell, and feel of a mask. This creates extreme discomfort and forces them to fiddle with the covering. That’s why children result to meltdowns, because they are trying to communicate discomfort. This is where small-dose practice helps.

Create a Custom Mask

By taking the child’s sensitivities into account, you can make your own face mask. Some parents tend to use the child’s old T-shirts. The pattern, material, and smell can be very comfortable. It provides reassurance for those who can’t get used to commercial facial coverings.

Consider Alternatives

If the child still can’t tolerate a face mask, relying on alternatives can prove useful. Products like face shields are a great way to protect their health. Also, using a Plexiglass divider in smaller rooms can give children their necessary break from wearing a face mask. It can boost their focus and help them get accustomed to wearing a facial covering.

4. Adjusting the Face Mask

The mask is constantly exposed to droplets and hazardous pathogens. When a child sneezes or coughs, the material acts as a barrier against these pathogens. But, it’s not a total method of protection. The eyes are still vulnerable and exposed to the virus. If the child doesn’t adjust the mask properly, they risk transferring the infection from their hands into their body.

Before and after a child touches the mask, they should wash their hands with soap and water. This will help get rid of the germs and avoid infections.

The safest way to readjust the facial covering is to hold the mask by the ear loops—one hand on each side. The face mask should completely cover the mouth and nose. There shouldn’t be any gaps between the skin and the face mask. The same tactic can be used when removing the face mask.

 

References

https://www.understood.org/en/school-learning/choosing-starting-school/back-to-school/trouble-wearing-mask

https://kidshealth.org/en/parents/coronavirus-masks.html

https://www.ualberta.ca/alberta-respiratory-centre/media-library/back-to-school-with-a-mask-printable-8.pdf

https://www.groupeproxim.ca/en/article/adjusting-removing-and-cleaning-your-face-mask#

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Vancouver School Exposures – Updated on April 30, 2021

As more places in the country continue to reopen, kids are starting to make their way back to school as well. Parents are naturally concerned about what schools are doing for COVID-19 and kids. All schools in the greater Vancouver region have dedicated safety plans to look after students’ health.

To develop a greater understanding of the term, exposure refers to a single person with a lab-confirmed COVID-19 infection, and they attend school. A cluster refers to two or more individuals with lab-confirmed COVID-19 infection, who attend school during their infectious period. Lastly, an outbreak refers to multiple individuals with lab-confirmed COVID-19 infections.

In the case of a COVID-19 school exposures alert, there’s no need to take any action until the parents receive contact from public health or the school itself. If a child faces direct exposure, the public health unit will notify parents regarding the situation and what actions they should take to take care of the child.

There’s a rigorous protocol in place to ensure that the entire school doesn’t have to shut down in the case of an exposure. These protocols are present to help manage COVID-19 school exposures as smoothly as possible, without disrupting the academic year. Here’s a list of all the COVID 19 school exposures in Great Vancouver (updated April 30, 2010)

Current Exposures:

Abbotsford School District #34

Aberdeen Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15

Abbotsford Middle

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15-16 and 19-23

Abbotsford Senior Secondary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15, 16, 21 and 23

Abbotsford Traditional Senior Secondary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15, 16, 21 and 23

ASIA – Sumas Mountain 6-9 

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15, 20 and 21

Blue Jay Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15-16 and 22-23

Centennial Park Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 19-22

Clayburn Middle School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 19-23

Clearbrook Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 20

Colleen and Gordie Howe Middle

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 20

Ecole Clearbrook Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 20

Eugene Reimer Middle School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15-16 and 19-23

Harry Sayers Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15

McMillan Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15, 16 and 19

Mountain Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15

Rick Hansen Secondary 

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 23

Robert Bateman Secondary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 23

Ross Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 16

W.J. Mouat Secondary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 23

William A. Fraser Middle School

Potential exposure date(s):  Apr 16, 19, 20, 21, and 23

Yale Secondary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15-16 and 19-23

Burnaby School District #41

Brentwood Park Elementary

Potential exposure date(s):  Apr 23

Burnaby Central Secondary

Potential exposure date(s):  Apr 15-16 and 19-21

Burnaby South Secondary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 16 and 19-21

Byrne Creek Community Secondary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15 and 19-21

Canada Way Learning Centre

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 22

Chaffey-Burke Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 22

Clinton Elementary

Potential exposure date(s):  Apr 16

Ecole Alpha Secondary

Potential exposure date(s):  Apr 15 and 16

Ecole Brantford Elementary

Potential exposure date(s):  Apr 19

Ecole Cariboo Hill Secondary

Potential exposure date(s):  Apr 15 and 16

Ecole Marlborough Elementary

Potential exposure date(s):  Apr 15 and 20

Edmonds Community Elementary

Potential exposure date(s):  Apr 15-16 and 20-21

Maywood Community Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15-16 and 19-21

Montecito Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 16 and 19-23

Moscrop Secondary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 16 and 19-21

South Slope Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15

Windsor Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 20 and 21

Chilliwack School District #33

 AD Rundle Middle School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 22 and 23

Chilliwack Middle

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 16, 19 and 20

Chilliwack Secondary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 16

GW Graham Secondary

Potential exposure date(s): April 15-16 and 19-20

Little Mountain Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15 and 16

Sardis Secondary

Potential exposure date(s):  Apr 15 and 16

Vedder Middle School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15, 16, 23 and 26

Conseil Scolaire Francophone 

École Andre-Piolat (North Vancouver)

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 26 and 27

Coquitlam School District #43

Aspenwood Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 22

Bramblewood Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 19 and 20

Castle Park Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15-16 and 19-20

Central Community Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15 and 16

Centennial Secondary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15-16 and 19-22

Eagle Mountain Middle

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 22

Ecole Citadel Middle

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15-16 and 19-22

Ecole Dr Charles Best Secondary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 20 and 21

Ecole Glen Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15-16 and 19-22

Ecole Kilmer Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 16

Ecole Kwayhquitlum Middle School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 19

Ecole Maillard Middle

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15 and 16

Ecole Maple Creek Middle

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 19-21

Ecole Nestor Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 16

Ecole Pitt River Middle School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 20-22

Ecole Riverside Secondary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 16, 19 and 20

Gleneagle Secondary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 20-22

Hazel Trembath Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15-16 and 19-20

Heritage Woods Secondary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15, and 19-21

 James Park Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15 and 16

Pinetree Secondary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15 and 19-21

Scott Creek Middle

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 21

Terry Fox Secondary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 5 and 16

Delta School District #37

Chalmers Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15 and 16

Cougar Canyon Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 21 and 22

Delta Secondary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 23

Delview Secondary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15-16 and 19-20

Gray Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15 and 16

Heath Traditional Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 16

Richardson Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15-16 and 19-20

Sands Secondary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 19, 20, and 23

Seaquam Secondary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 19 and 20

South Delta Secondary

Potential exposure date(s): April 19 and 20

South Park Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): April 19 and 20

Sunshine Hills Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): April 16 and 19

Langley School District #35

Aldergrove Community Secondary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 19 and 20

Alice Brown Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15 and 16

Betty Gilbert Middle

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15, 16, and 19

Dorothy Peacock Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15 and 16

Douglas Park Community Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 23

H D Stafford Middle 

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 23

James Kennedy Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 22 and 23

Langley Secondary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 16, 21 and 23

Parkside Centennial Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15

Peter Ewart Middle

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15-16, 19,  and 21-23

R.E. Mountain Secondary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15-16 and 21-22

Richard Bulpitt Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 23

Shortreed Community Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15-16 and 19-21

Vanguard Secondary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15

Walnut Grove Secondary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15-16 and 20-22

Willoughby Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15, 16, 19, 22 and 23

Yorkson Creek Middle

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 19 and 20

Maple Ridge School District #42

Blue Mountain Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15 and 16

c’usqunela Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15 and 16

Golden Ears Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 16, 19 and 20

Hammond Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15

Thomas Haney Secondary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 19

Westview Secondary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 20 and 21

Yennadon Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15

Mission School District #75

Ecole Heritage Park Middle

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 16 and 19

Ecole Mission Senior Secondary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15

Mission Central Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 16

New Westminster School District #40

Ecole Glenbrook Middle School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 23

Ecole Lord Tweedsmuir Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 20 and 22

Ecole Qayqayt Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15 and 16

Lord Kelvin Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 16 and 19-21

New Westminster Secondary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 16

Queensborough Middle 

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 19 and 20

Richard McBride Elementary 

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15 and 16

North Vancouver School District #44

Blueridge Elementary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 14-16

Canyon Heights Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 8-9 and 12-16

Capilano Elementary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 13-15 and 19

Carson Graham Secondary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 19, 21-23 and 27

École Argyle Secondary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 22

École Braemar Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 14-16

École Handsworth Secondary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 8 – 9 and Apr 12

École Sherwood Park Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 12 and 13

École Windsor Secondary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 12-16 and 19

Queensbury Elementary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 13-16 and 19-21

Seycove Secondary

Potential exposure date(s):  Apr 14-16, 23, and 26

Richmond School District #38

Blair Elementary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 26

Blundell Elementary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 22 and 23

Bridge Elementary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 14-16

Cook Elementary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 19 to 22

Donald McKay Elementary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 19

Diefenbaker Elementary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 22 and 23

École Secondaire R.A. McMath Secondary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 6-9 and 12-13

Ferris Elementary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 7-8 and 12-13

General Currie Elementary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 16

Hugh Boyd Secondary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 21 and 23

Hugh McRoberts Secondary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 20 to 22

Lord Byng Elementary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 12 and 13

Matthew McNair Secondary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 6-9, 12-13 and 16

Mitchell Elementary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 22 and 23

Steveston-London Secondary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 20 to 23

Sea to Sky District #48

Howe Sound Secondary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 9, 12-16, and 19

Sunshine District #46

École Chatelech Secondary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 26 and 27

Surrey School District #36

Adult Education Centre

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 20

A H P Matthew Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 19-23

A J McLellan Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 16

Beaver Creek Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 16

Betty Huff Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 19 and 21-23

Bonaccord Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 16

Boundary Park Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 19 and 21-23

Bridgeview Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 21

Brookside Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15 and 16

Cambridge Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 21 to 23

Cedar Hills Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15

Chimney Hill Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15-16 and 20-22

Cindrich Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15-16, 21-23 and 26

Clayton Heights Secondary

Potential exposure date(s):  Apr 19 and 20

Cougar Creek Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15 and 16

Coyote Creek Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15 and 16

Creekside Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 21 and 23

Don Christian Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 21-23

Earl Marriott Secondary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15

Ecole Laronde Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15 and 16

Ecole Riverdale Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 20-23

Ecole Salish Secondary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15-16 and 21-23

Ecole Martha Currie Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 16

Ecole Peace Arch Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 21 and 22

Ecole Woodward Hill Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 19-20

Enver Creek Secondary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15-16 and 20-22

Fleetwood Park Secondary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15 and 19-22

Frank Hurt Secondary 

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 19-23

Fraser Heights Secondary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15 and 19-23

George Greenaway Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 20 and 21

Georges Vanier Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 20 to 22

Goldstone Park Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 21 and 22

Green Timbers Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15 and 16

Guildford Park Secondary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15-16 and 19-23

Harold Bishop Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 19-21

Henry Bose Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 19-20

Hjorth Road Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 19-22

Janice Churchill Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15-16 and 19-22

Johnston Heights Secondary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 19

K B Woodward Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15-16 and 19-21

Kennedy Trail Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15

Kwantlen Park Secondary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 19-21 and 23

LA Matheson Secondary

Potential exposure date(s):  Apr 15-16, 19-21 and 26

Latimer Road Elementary

Potential exposure date(s):  Apr 23

Lord Tweedsmuir Secondary

Potential exposure date(s):  Apr 15 and 19

Martha Currie Elementary

Potential exposure date(s):  Apr 20 and 21

Martha Jane Norris Elementary

Potential exposure date(s):  Apr 19 and 20

Mountainview Montessori

Potential exposure date(s):  Apr 19 and 20

Newton Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15-16 and 19

North Surrey Secondary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15-16 and 19-20

Old Yale Road Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15, 16 and 19

Panorama Park Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 16 and 21-23

Panorama Ridge Secondary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15-16 and 19-20

Prince Charles Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 19-23

Princess Margaret Secondary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15, 19, 20 and 26

Queen Elizabeth Secondary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15 and 19

Royal Heights Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15 and 16

Senator Reid Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 20-23

Serpentine Heights Elementary

Potential exposure date(s):  Apr 16 and 19-23

Sullivan Elementary

Potential exposure date(s):  Apr 22 and 23

Sullivan Heights Secondary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15, 19, 21 and 22

Sunnyside Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15 and 16

Surrey Traditional

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15, 16, 19, and 20

Tamanawis Secondary

Potential exposure date(s):  Apr 15, 16, 19 and 26

Walnut Road Elementary

Potential exposure date(s):  Apr 15 and 16

Westerman Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 16

White Rock Elementary 

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 19

William Watson Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 22 and 23

White Rock Elementary 

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 19

Woodland Park Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 19-21

Vancouver School District #39

Britannia Community Elementary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 13

Charles Dickens Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 12-13

David Thompson Secondary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 12-16

École Bilingue Elementary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15-16 and 19

Eric Hamber Secondary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 13 and 15

Gladstone Secondary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15-16 and 19

General Brock Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 12 and 13

Grandview Elementary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 12

Graham Bruce Elementary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 13 and 14

G. T. Cunningham Elementary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 12

John Oliver Secondary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 13 and 14

King George Secondary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15-16

Kitsilano Secondary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 12-16

Lord Beaconsfield Elementary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 12-16

Lord Byng Secondary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 12-16

Lord Selkirk Elementary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 16

Lord Roberts Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 12 and 13

Maple Grove Elementary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 12 and 14-16

Nootka Community Elementary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 19-21

Pierre Elliott Trudeau Elementary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 19-20

Queen Elizabeth Elementary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 12-15

Sir Charles Tupper Secondary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 20-23

Sir Richard McBride Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 18

Sir Wilfred Grenfell Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 12-16 and 19-21

Sir Wilfred Laurier Elementary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 12

Tecumseh Annex School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 19-21

Thunderbird Elementary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 12-14 and 19

Vancouver Technical Secondary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15 and 16

Walter Moberly Elementary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 12

Waverley Elementary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 10 and 15

 

Windermere Secondary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 12-16

Xpey’ Elementary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 12-14

West Vancouver School District #45

Bowen Island Community School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 14-16

Irwin Park Elementary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 13-15

Ridgeview Elementary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 12 and 13

Rockridge Secondary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 12

West Vancouver Secondary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 14-16

Independent Schools

Abbotsford Christian Elementary

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 20

B.C. Muslim School (Richmond)

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 12, 15, 19, and 20

Bodwell High School (North Vancouver)

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 16 and 19-21

Cornerstone Montessori

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 16

Credo Christian Elementary (Langley)

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 16, 19, 21, and 22

Credo Christian High (Langley)

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 16, 20, 22, and 23

Dasmesh Punjabi

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 16, 19, 20, and 21

Deer Lake SDA (Burnaby)

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 16

Diamond (Surrey)

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 16

École Élémentaire James Gilmore Elementary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 21

Fraser Valley (Surrey)

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 21 to 23

G.A.D. Elementary School (Surrey)

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 16, 19, and 20

Highroad Academy (Chilliwack)

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 19 to 21

Holy Cross Elementary (Burnaby)

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 16

Iqra Islamic (Surrey)

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 16, 21, and 23

John Knox Christian – Elementary Campus

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 20 and 21

Khalsa Secondary (Surrey)

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 21 and 26

Khalsa School Newton (Surrey)

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 16, 19 and 23

Khalsa School of the Fraser Valley (Langley)

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 16, 21, and 22

Langley Christian School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 19 to 23

Mennonite Educational Institute (Abbotsford)

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 19 to 21

Our Lady of Good Counsel (Surrey)

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 16 and 20-21

Our Lady of Mercy (Burnaby)

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 16 and 19-22

Pacific Academy (Surrey)

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 16, 20-21, and 23

Pivot Point Family Growth Centre (Surrey)

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 19 to 21

Queen of All Saints School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 22 and 23

Sikh Academy

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 16, 19 and 22

St. Andrew’s Elementary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 16

Saint Anthony’s School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 22 and 23

St. Bernadette (Surrey)

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 19 and 20

St. Joseph The Worker Catholic Elementary School

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 19

St. Mary (Chilliwack)

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 12-16

St Michaels (Burnaby)

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 12-14

St. Thomas More Collegiate (Burnaby)

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 14

Southridge School (Surrey)

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 21

Surrey Muslim

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 19-21

The Westside School (Vancouver )

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 7 and 8

Unity Christian (Chilliwack)

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 13-16 and 19-20

Urban Academy (New Westminster)

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 12-15

White Rock Christian Academy

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 19 and 20

Vancouver College (Vancouver)

Potential exposure date(s): Apr 15 and 16

While the initial implementation of the COVID-19 school exposure system was shaky, these protocols are necessary to help ensure that the transition back to schools is done as smoothly as possible.

Parents can feel more comfortable when they’re fully in the know about the status of COVID-19 in their child’s school. While there are still arguments to be had about whether or not it’s safe to reopen the school system, there’s no doubt that the implementation of such protocols is necessary to ensure children’s safety.

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Why Is It Important for Children to Wear Face Masks?

ASTM Level 2 Procedure Face Mask for Kids

In light of the recent Covid-19 pandemic, and as per CDC recommendations, all individuals must wear face masks to help prevent the spread of the coronavirus. These recommendations are also extended to children who are susceptible to the virus and can quickly spread it as well. It is next to impossible to keep your child indoors for nearly an entire year.

At some point, kids will be exposed to the outside world, and perhaps even with someone who has been infected with the coronavirus. This is especially true, considering how unsure most countries around the world are about reopening schools, it is essential for parents to reinforce protective practices in their children so that they stay safe from this deadly virus.

One of the most important methods of preventing this disease’s spread is by wearing a face mask! This includes getting your child to wear one as well. 

What Kind of Face Mask Should Your Child Wear?

According to the World Health Organisation, kids who do not have any underlying health issues can wear non-medical or fabric masks. However, the best kind of mask for your child would be one that offers adequate protection and is easy to breathe in as well.

Level 2 masks that have an adjustable nose bar and elastic ear loops are perfectly suited for children to wear. They are also the safest and most comfortable masks you could use for your child.

Three-layered masks made from non-woven fabric and filter material should always be given priority over other kinds of face masks for children. This is because such masks offer excellent protection against bacteria and viruses like the coronavirus while being breathable and comfortable to wear. Having colorful masks can also encourage kids to wear them more often. 

When Should Kids Wear Masks?

It’s recommended that children always keep a mask on when stepping out of their homes. Nonetheless, at times, some parents may wish to remove their child’s facemask for a while. However, kids should always have a face mask on under the following circumstances:

  • If a distance of more than 6 ft cannot be maintained
  • If your child is in a crowded area or an indoor environment that isn’t their home
  • If your child is exhibiting symptoms related to the coronavirus such as dry cough and fever
  • If stated by law 

The Perfect Mask for Your Kid

Wearing a face mask is essential for kids to protect them from the Covid19 pandemic. However, not all masks are suitable for kids and maybe uncomfortable for them to wear and breathe in. Soothy Garden’s ASTM Level 2 Procedure Face Mask for Kids is an excellent product when it comes to protective face masks for children.

Not only are these facemasks colorful and fun, but they are also made from the best quality non-woven fabric and filter material. Making them breathable and soft yet highly effective. Their adjustable nose bar and elastic ear loops ensure that the mask remains firmly in place over your child’s nose and mouth, and they remain safe from all sorts of bacteria and viruses.  

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School Mask Requirements of Great Vancouver

Back to school

The new academic year is around the corner with schools reopening soon, but this year will be different from others. To start the 2020 school year, students and staff members will all be wearing face masks for most of their day. They’ll all also need to carry additional face masks with them, due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, it’s time to make the transition back to everyday life while keeping each other safe. People are starting to return to their jobs, and schools are slowly beginning to reopen as well. However, if treated too carelessly, COVID-19 could spread more quickly.

As a result of the ongoing risk, any businesses or institutions reopening again will be enforcing strict operational protocols. While adapting to these new rules may be uncomfortable for some of us, it is essential to help reduce further spreading of the virus. 

Schools are no different. Since they are home to hundreds of staff and thousands of students every day, they are at higher risk of hosting an outbreak of the virus if people are not careful. Thanks to the actions of the government and local school boards, schools that are reopening have strict mask requirements and other protective protocols.

In the area of Great Vancouver, each school district is enforcing rules regarding face masks for students. The details of these school mask requirements of Great Vancouver are given below. Find your City below!

Vancouver

The Board of Education passed a motion (August 19, 2020) encouraging the wearing of non-medical face masks by all students and staff at all times while in school.

  • Every student and staff member will be given masks when they return to school.
  • Students and staff will have the choice to wear a mask in the classroom.
  • Secondary students will wear masks while in high traffic areas, like hallways, and any time they are outside of the classroom or learning group and they cannot physically distance from others.
  • Students in Grades 6 and 7 will wear masks while in high traffic areas like hallways or when outside of their learning group.
  • Staff in both elementary and secondary schools will wear masks while in high traffic areas, like hallways, and any time they are outside of the classroom or learning group and they cannot physically distance from others
More information about COVID-19 Health and Safety Guideline in Vancouver Schools: https://www.vsb.bc.ca/News/Documents/20200813_Fact%20Sheet_H&S_General%20FINAL.pdf

West Vancouver

When you need to ware masks

  • Non-medical masks are required to be used in situations where a person cannot maintain physical distance and is in close proximity to a person outside of their cohort or household .
  • Secondary students and staffs are required to wear non-medical masks in high traffic areas such as buses and in common areas, such as hallways or anytime outside of their learning group whenever physical distancing cannot be maintained.
  • Itinerant teachers and specialists interacting with multiple learning groups are required to wear a non-medical mask . 

Other policies about masks

  • Wearing a non-medical mask or face covering in schools, outside of the requirements above, is a personal choice. It is important to treat people wearing masks with respect.
  • No student needs to wear a non-medical mask if they do not tolerate it.
  • Those that choose to wear non-medical masks must still seek to maintain physical distance from people outside of their cohort. There must be no crowding, gathering or congregating of people from different cohorts, or those practicing physical distancing, even if non-medical masks are worn.
  • Schools will consider requesting students and staff have a non-medical mask or face covering available at school and accessible should they become ill while at school.
  • Wearing non-medical masks at all times in schools is not recommended as there are multiple more effective infection prevention and exposure control measures in place.
More detailed information about school reopening COVID-19 safety plan in West Vancouver: https://westvancouverschools.ca/wp-content/uploads/2020/08/Safety-Plan-September-2020.pdf 

North Vancouver

  • Non-medical masks or face coverings are required to be worn by staff and middle and secondary students in high traffic areas, in common areas (e.g. hallways) or in situations where physical distancing cannot be maintained and the person is interacting with people outside of their learning group (e.g. Teachers Teaching on Call , specialist teachers or Education Assistants required to work in close proximity to students across learning groups).
  • Exceptions will be made for students who cannot wear masks for medical reasons.
  • Schools will also ensure non-medicla masks are available for staff if someone should become ill while at school.
  • Beyond the above, wearing a non-medical mask or face covering in schools is a personal choice what will be respected. Re-usable face masks will be made available for staff and students who choose to wear one, and upon request.

More detailed information about school reopening COVID-19 safety plan in North Vancouver: https://www.sd44.ca/COVID-19/BacktoSchoolSeptember2020FAQs/Pages/default.aspx#/=

New Westminter

Elementary Students

Non-medical masks are not recommended for elementary school students due to the increased likelihood they will touch their faces and eyes, as well as require assistance to properly put on and take off their mask. Masks will be provided upon request of parent/guardian.

Middle/Secondary Students

Non-medical masks or face coverings are required for all middle and secondary staff and students when they are indoors in high traffic areas; e.g., hallways, common areas, etc., and anytime they are outside of their classroom or Learning Group and physical distance cannot be maintained.

Staff (classroom-based)

Staff are required to wear a non-medical mask/face covering in high traffic areas and in common areas such as hallways and anytime outside of their Learning Group. Staff can also wear a mask/face covering within their classroom or Learning Group if that is their personal preference.

Staff (Other- Itinerant, Specialist, EAs, etc.)

Staff who routinely interact with more than one Learning Group must practice physical distancing and wear a non-medical mask at all times. Staff providing health care services and other health care providers are required to wear a mask when working in close proximity with students.

Other considerations:

  •  Medical grade masks (i.e., N95) are only recommended for health care workers and other related professions. Good hand hygiene and sanitization practices are recommended and are the most effective prevention strategy.
  • A supply of reusable masks (max 2 per school year) will be available for staff.
  • Individual decisions by staff are respected where an acceptable explanation is provided to their supervisor. In certain circumstances, a staff member’s medical conditions may make the wearing of a mask inadvisable.
  • Where the wearing of a mask demonstrably impacts the delivery of an educational service (e.g., speech pathology services or certain specialized services), a location may require adaption by the installation (permanently or temporarily) of shielding (e.g., plexiglass) as a transmission barrier. The site administrator is responsible for consulting with the staff member on such a need/request.
  • Masks on young children can be irritating and may lead to increased touching of the face and eyes and will not generally be encouraged.

More detailed information about school reopening COVID-19 safety plan in New Westminter: https://newwestschools.ca/wp-content/uploads/2020/08/COVID19-HS-PLAN-version-1.5-Aug19-2020-002.pdf

Burnaby

Masks are required for staff and students (Grades 6-12) in high traffic areas such as hallways or when outside learning groups.

More information about school COVID-19 guildline in Burnaby: https://burnabyschools.ca/wp-content/uploads/2020/08/HealthAndSafety_Fall2020_InfoPage_20.08.26_web_final.pdf

Richmond

  • Every student and staff member will receive two reusable masks when they return to school.
  • Any student or staff member may choose to wear a mask at any time.
  • All staff and secondary students will be required to wear masks while in high traffic areas such as hallways or when outside of their learning group.

More information about Richmond schools Health and Safety for COVID-19: https://www.sd38.bc.ca/sites/default/files/2020-08/Fact%20Sheet%20-%20Health%20and%20Safety.pdf

Coquitlam/Port Coquitlam

For Middle Students

Middle schools will operate on the same model as elementary schools around learning groups/cohorts, protocols and procedures. Face masks for students and staff will be made available and, though their use is optional, the use of masks in areas of the school where physical distancing is difficult to maintain such as hallways and common areas will be strongly recommended. Exploration classes will be offered in a modified format.

For Secondary Students

Face masks for students and staff will be made available and, though their use is optional, the use of masks in areas of the school where physical distancing is difficult to maintain such as hallways and common areas will be strongly recommended.

More Info about Return to School Guidelines in Coquitlam: https://www.sd43.bc.ca/Pages/newsitem.aspx?ItemID=527&ListID=ed550773-e9ff-4e20-9964-4e1b213f518c&TemplateID=Announcement_Item#/=

Surrey

Elementary School: Masks available for students who would like to wear one; 

Secondary School: Masks required in all high traffic areas such as buses and in common areas such as hallways when physical distancing cannot be maintained

Surrey Schools’ Guideline: https://www.surreyschools.ca/NewsEvents/Posts/Lists/Photos/SSC_BackToSchool_Elementary_FINAL.pdf

Delta

  • Masks will be required for staff and secondary students in high traffic areas in common areas such as hallways, or anytime outside of their learning group whenever physical distancing cannot be maintained. Exceptions will be made for students who cannot wear a mask for medical reasons.
  • Schools will ensure non-medical masks are available for staff and students.
  • The decision to wear a mask in the classroom is a personal one that will be respected.

More information about Delta School Stage 2: Health and Safety Measures: https://www.deltasd.bc.ca/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2020/08/Stage-2-Health-and-Safety-Measures-V2.pdf

Langley

School Supplies: Two (2) non-medical masks will be made available to each staff member and student from Grades 4- 12. Schools will be communicating information regarding the distribution of masks. 

For Staff: Staff are required to wear a non-medical mask in high traffic areas such as buses or hallways, or anytime outside of their learning group, whenever physical distancing cannot be maintained. Staff can also wear a mask or face shield within their classroom or learning group if that is their personal preference.

For Students: Students in middle and secondary school are required to wear non-medical masks in high traffic areas such as buses or hallways, or anytime outside of their learning group whenever physical distancing cannot be maintained; exceptions will be made for students who cannot wear masks for medical reasons. Even when wearing a mask, staff and students will still be required to maintain physical distance from people outside of their learning group.

Other guidelines:

  • Students will have the choice to wear a mask in the classroom
  • Staff will have the choice to wear a mask when interacting within their learning group
  • Everyone must treat each other and those wearing masks with respect
  • Elementary school students (K-3) are not required to wear masks

More Langley school Phase 2 Education Restart Plan: https://www.sd35.bc.ca/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2020/08/Education-Restart-Plan-2020Aug26-Final.pdf 

Conclusion

Enforcing rules like these is never easy, especially when it comes to large groups and vulnerable populations. Some individuals even contest the mandatory mask rules. However, provinces and school boards have deemed them necessary for a reason: they lower the transmission of the COVID-19 virus. 

While schools transitioned to the digital sphere for the last semester, the world must slowly learn to live with this virus as it may stay with us for years. The first step in adapting to this new reality is the introduction of school mask requirements. 

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5 Things Every Parent Should Do Before Schools Reopen

For months, parents around the world have been quarantining with their children to protect their families from COVID-19. But, now, as the numbers of new cases go down and the virus’s peak has passed, there’s talk of schools reopening.

So far, the news tells us schools will open in September. And if this makes you feel uneasy or concerned about your children’s wellbeing, you’re not alone. But, worry alone will not help. The question we must ask is, what steps can parents take to protect their children at school?

Wearing a mask

It isn’t enough to put a mask on your child and send them to school. Often things that seem simple to adults are difficult for children to understand. A child may take off a mask because they’re uncomfortable or because their nose was itchy.

Many parents are hoping cartoon masks will appeal to their children. But what is stopping your child from swapping their Tom and Jerry mask for another child’s Ben 10 one? If you want to keep your child safe, you need to talk to them. Explain to them why masks matter so much.

Social distancing

The term of 2020 is social distancing. Children understand things in context, so your child may wash their hands at home, but they aren’t used to social distancing at school. The chances are without the proper discussion, they’ll go back to what they usually do at school. You need to tell them why they can’t hug their friends, swap toys, or share lunch boxes and water bottles. Because it only takes two kids drinking from the same bottle to put your family at risk.

Washable backpacks

Once schools open, every family will have to develop a routine to disinfect daily. Some normal steps include changing clothes and shoes, showering, and separating the “outside” items from the “inside” things. You may want to set up a room or washroom for this purpose. That way, minimal germs enter the house.

One step parents can take to make the process easier is to get washable cloth backpacks. We know by now that the virus can stick to any surface. So, if an infected person touches, sneezes, or coughs on your child’s backpack, they can bring the virus home. Getting washable bags makes it easy to wash and disinfect bags regularly.

Packed lunches

It’s easy to rely on school lunches, but you don’t know who is making them. There’s always some level of risk with outside food. Try to send your child to school with a packed lunch. Make sure they have a spoon and fork, and a water bottle. And that they don’t take anything from anyone else.

Question the school

Schools are required to take steps to protect students before they can open. As a responsible parent, you can ask your child’s teacher how many students per classroom, the distance between desks, steps for social distancing, and mask policies. Also, inquire about any new learning methods since most schools will try a ‘blended learning’ approach that combines classroom teaching with home learning.

Conclusion

Coronavirus is the new reality that we have to live with…and rather embrace. On the opening of schools, schools and parents should partner to develop a better strategy to prevent the spread of virus.

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COVID-19 in Children: Can My Child Get Infected? How Do I Keep Them Safe?

With over 11.8 million cases recorded, the pandemic continues to spread. With schools getting closed and playdates reduced to a minimum, parents are now terrified about their children’s health and well-being. The virus has taken a toll on children’s lives, ruining their day-to-day routines.

Parents are uncertain if a child will have the exact same symptoms as an adult, or the infection poses a more serious threat. Here, we will answer all your questions for you to help you get properly prepared.

What Are the Odds of a Child Getting Infected with COVID-19?

According to the United Kingdom National Health Service, anyone can get infected with COVID-19, including children. But, it seems that the virus is less prevalent in the younger generation, while more present in adults and the elderly.

Based on clinical reports, out of 150,000 COVID-19 cases in the U.S., only around 2,500 were registered in children. That’s about 1.7% of the infected. Similar reports have been shown in different regions and countries, especially Italy and China, where the outbreak has left a major impact.

Despite the countless recorded cases around the globe, not that many children have lost their lives due to COVID-19. While every child is capable of getting infected, they are not as prone to diseases as the older population. They also have less chance to contract something as severe as the coronavirus.

The reason for that is the body structure and the number of antibodies. Since children get sick with the flu often, their body produces more antibodies and a lot quicker. The antibodies don’t overreact with the virus and tend to remove the pathogens much faster.

What About Children With Diabetes?

Unfortunately, any person with an underlying medical condition, like diabetes, is more vulnerable to the disease. If a child already has diabetes, they are at high risk of contracting the coronavirus.

The same thing applies to children with cardiovascular diseases, genetic illnesses, and poor immune system.

Are Toddlers At Risk of COVID-19?

COVID-19 in toddlers is very rare, but still possible. If they do get infected, the virus can be a serious problem for their overall health, particularly in babies younger than one year.

Toddlers are extremely vulnerable to diseases. Their immune system is underdeveloped, and their body has very tiny airways. If the infection were to cause breathing difficulties, like it’s the case with COVID-19, it could turn into a critical illness.

How to Protect Your Child from COVID-19?

Keeping your child safe from the virus should be a top priority. The CDC advises parents to do that by:

  • Teaching children proper hygiene
  • Inspiring them to wear a face mask
  • Encouraging them to play outdoors and stay socially active
  • Show them the importance of keeping a safe distance

What to Do If Your Child Gets Infected?

If you notice any flu-like symptoms, high temperature, or trouble breathing, get your child tested. If they test positive, seek medical help in the pediatric care unit immediately. Your doctor will provide your child with the supportive care they need, including medicine and treatment.